Blog

Submitted by Nancy Kauffman,

90 years ago this month, Douglas Fairbanks released his fantasy spectacle The Thief of Bagdad. This was Fairbanks’ biggest and most prestigious film produced to date and was one of the most expensive films of the 1920s with a budget of over $1,000,000. Fairbanks wrote, produced, and starred in the film, and was able to bring his artistic vision to the screen with the exceptional assistance of director Raoul Walsh, production designer William Cameron Menzies, and cinematographer Arthur Edeson.

Submitted by nbrandreth,

We're getting ready for a fantastic Handmade Gelatin Photographic Paper workshop and it's simply too fascinating to let slip by without mention.



Submitted by Bruce Barnes,

Conservation Department

Thanks to the generosity of hundreds of donors, we have created an endowment for our Department of Conservation. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation initially funded a $3 million challenge grant, which required that George Eastman House receive $2 million in matching cash contributions before drawing on the endowment. As a final push, we directed our 2013 year-end appeal to close the remaining gap. We were immensely gratified when the contributions received exceeded our goal.

Submitted by Rachel Pikus,

The Hollywood Reporter recently brought together five generations from the family tree of the real-life Solomon Northup portrayed in the film 12 Years a Slave (Steve McQueen, US/UK 2013). Eastman House had the great honor of hosting the photo shoot for Northrup’s 26 upstate New York descendants. Similar gatherings were held for Northrup’s other family members in Los Angeles and Washington, D.C.
 

Submitted by Amy Kinsey,

For the last 20 years, in February, George Eastman House has organized the Dutch Connection to show the kind of flowers George Eastman enjoyed in his home from late fall to early spring. Although there is no record of his bulb order for 1913/1914, historic records indicate that Mr.

Submitted by jhealy,
Magnolia (1999) Magnolia (1999)
Submitted by Nancy Kauffman,

February 2, 2014 is a significant date in the history of cinema. One hundred years ago on this date, a face that was to become one of the most recognized faces in the world was first illuminated on movie screens. That face was Charlie Chaplin’s, and on February 2, 1914, his first film was released in the United States.

Chaplin’s character of “the Little Tramp” didn’t spring forth on that day fully formed in baggy pants and bowler hat.  Almost, but not quite! The film was Making a Living and Chaplin donned a long frock coat, top hat, and sinister mustache.

Submitted by nbrandreth,

We’re excited about a new workshop at George Eastman House in February: Digital Negative Making. For years we have taught a growing number of photographers how to make their own photographic negatives on glass using historic processes. Realizing that not everyone is interested in going that route, we decided to look into a new approach for the rest of the world: the “digital” negative.
 

Submitted by Rachel Pikus,

Guest blog by Turner Classic Movie’s Scott McGee. McGee will be in person at the Dryden Theatre on Saturday, February 1 to introduce the film BULLITT (1968) and the importance of this film to the history of stuntmen, and particularly stunt driving.

Submitted by Rachel Pikus,

Win this poster!

Screen shot 2014-01-15 at 5.59.13 PM

Submitted by Bruce Barnes,

Conservation Department

It is with great pride and pleasure that George Eastman House welcomes Lisa Hostetler, PhD, as the new Curator-in- Charge of our Department of Photography. This position is of such importance to our institution that I personally conducted the search. Over the course of the process, I met with more than a dozen curators, but from its inception I considered Lisa to be the leading candidate.

Submitted by Rachel Pikus,

This month, Lisa Hostetler, PhD, joined the Eastman House staff as Curator-in-Charge of the Department of Photography. This is Part II of a recent conversation with Hostetler about the current state of photography, her interests in the medium, and her plans for working with the Eastman House collection. Click here to read Part 1!

Submitted by Rachel Pikus,

This month, Lisa Hostetler, PhD, joined the Eastman House staff as Curator-in-Charge of the Department of Photography. We recently spoke with Hostetler about the current state of photography, her interests in the medium, and her plans for working with the Eastman House collection.

Submitted by Rachel Pikus,

Last week, we decided to change things up a bit on Instagram. Taking a break from our own behind-the-scenes photos from around the museum, we handed over the keys to visiting artists Nate Larson and Marni Shindelman for our first Instagram Takeover.

A few days before their lecture as part of our Wish You Were Here series, the takeover week began with Larson and Shindelman posting photos and videos related to trending hashtags.

Submitted by Bruce Barnes,

During my first year as director at George Eastman House, I have witnessed firsthand the countless ways that our staff, trustees, and supporters contribute to our three critical missions: preserving our worldclass collections, serving the Rochester community, and being a leader in the fields of photography and moving images.

Submitted by dcurro,

Last Wednesday, October 9, staged the long awaited world premiere of Too Much Johnson at Le Giornate del Cinema Muto Silent Film Festival in Pordenone, northern Italy. As a long time attendee of the festival, fan of the work of Orson Welles and the Mercury Theatre, and having had the honor to work at the preservation of Too Much Johnson, it was hard for me to stay away from Le Giornate this year.

Submitted by Director,

Director's note via Films & Events 9/10, 2013

The Intruder (1962) The Intruder (1962)

Submitted by Bruce Barnes,

The George Eastman Award for distinguished contribution to the art of film was established in 1955, and was the first award by an American film archive to honor artistic work of enduring value. In bestowing this honor, we recognize individuals who have enriched the field of motion pictures. Legendary recipients have ranged from George Cukor and Fred Astaire to Martin Scorsese and Meryl Steep.

Submitted by LisaKribsLaPierre,

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