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3a - Branding (images)

3a - Branding (images)

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CAPTION: “Technicolor Is Natural Color” advertisement, 1930. George Eastman House.

 

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CAPTION: Technicolor was a brand recognized the world over. “A Credit in Any Language” trade advertisement, 1950s. George Eastman House.

 

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CAPTION: From the 1910s through the 1940s, film advertisers promoted Technicolor with a variety of flashy slogans: “In Brilliant Technicolor,” “Technicolor Triumph,” “100% Technicolor,” and “Natural Technicolor.” In the 1950s, as color’s novelty waned, the company coined the simple yet memorable official credit, “Color by Technicolor,” a trademark still in use today. George Eastman House.

 

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CAPTION: This 1963 trade advertisement boasts of Technicolor’s value for theatre owners and film promoters. For decades, Technicolor’s name alone was often as much of a box office draw as any Hollywood actor, and a nod on a marquee or a poster could be counted upon to fill seats even for mediocre and forgettable fare. George Eastman House.