George Eastman Museum announces 2018 photography and film workshop schedule

Hands-on instruction from the museum’s experts in historic and alternative processes, make your own photographs, and see prime examples from the museum’s incomparable collections

Rochester, N.Y., November 13, 2017—The George Eastman Museum has announced its 2018 schedule of photography workshops, including several new programs, including a one-day tintype boot camp; hand-coloring film; creating Niepceotype, hyalotype, and albumen on glass plates; and an introduction to analog photography. In addition to workshops being held at the museum, excursion workshops are being offered on the Erie Canal and at Letchworth State Park.

In each one- to -five-day workshop, participants get hands-on instruction from the museum’s experts in historic and alternative processes. Workshop attendees not only make their own photographs, but also view prime examples of photographs and technology from the museum’s renowned collections.

“With the rapidly growing interest in historic and alternative photographic processes, we seek to contribute to the expanding movement of handmade photography by teaching how to make the same type of gelatin emulsions introduced by George Eastman in the 1880s,” said Mark Osterman, process historian, George Eastman Museum. “We encourage everyone from artists, to educators and students, to photography enthusiasts, to develop new skills and broaden their knowledge of these unique processes.”

2018 Photography Workshops
For more information about the museum’s photography workshops, including pricing and registration, visit eastman.org/workshops. To learn more about photographic processes, visit eastman.org/process-videos to watch the museums twelve-part video series.

Tintype Boot Camp—NEW!
February 10 December 1
No photographic experience is required to attend, and you’ll leave with a 5×7″ tintype portrait made by an experienced tintypist and an information packet on how that plate was made.

Digital Negative Making for Alternative & Historic Process Printing
March 7–9
This hands-on workshop will help you to harness the precision of digital imaging to produce negatives with your inkjet printer for a variety of your favorite historic and alternative printing processes.

Digital TransferGuest instructor Bonny Lhotka
March 21–23
Guest instructor Bonny Lhotka will teach this special workshop in which participants will experiment with using digital images to make photographic objects, creating digital prints as something other than works of ink on paper.

Miniature Tintypes
April 4–6
Use your own 35mm camera (or ours) to make 35mm tintype portraits and still life images.

Collodion Chloride
April 18–20
This workshop is offered only every other year, so we suggest you register early to secure a spot. This silver chloride printing-out paper dates to the 1860s but did not become popular until the 1890s.

Coloring Silent Film—SOLD OUT! 
May 2–3
In this workshop, learn how to chemically bleach and tone the silver image, tint film stock, and apply colors in selected areas of the film frame. This workshop has sold out; contact photographicworkshops@eastman.org to be added to the waitlist.

Making 35mm Motion Picture Film
May 7–10
Get hands-on experience making black-and-white 35mm perforated film stock.

Ambrotypes and Tintypes
May 21–25
Ambrotypes and tintypes are the hottest alternative processes used in fine art photography today. In this intensive five-day workshop, participants will be guided through the basics of making these unique positive wet-collodion images.

Erie Canal Tintype Excursion
June 4–8
Last offered four years ago, this workshop was inspired by the canal excursions held by select members of the Philadelphia Photograph Exchange Club back in the 1870s. We’ll pilot a 42-foot canal boat through step locks on the Erie Canal and tie up along the banks to take full-plate [6 ½ × 8 ½″] tintypes of the local scenery.

Gelatin Dry Plates in the Woods of Letchworth State Park
June 18–22
If you like camping, hiking, and large-format photography, this is the workshop for you.

Gelatin Emulsion Dry Plate Negatives
July 10–13
The basics of making gelatin emulsion dry plates are covered in this fun and informative emulsion workshop for beginners.

Intermediate Gelatin Emulsion Dry Plate Negatives
July 24–27
Building upon our basic gelatin emulsion workshops, this intermediate workshop takes emulsion making to the next level.

Niepceotype & Hyalotype; Albumen on Glass Plates—NEW!
August 1–3
The first photographic negative technique on glass, known as the Niepceotype, was also used to make the first photographic magic lantern transparencies, or hyalotypes. Albumen on glass photography was invented in 1847 and remains the highest resolution photographic process ever invented.

Salt and Albumen Printing
August 13–17
Learn the two most popular printing processes of the nineteenth century: salt and albumen.

Inventing Photography
August 29–31
Join us as we look into the earliest photographic printing processes dating from 1790 to 1841. We’ll use botanicals from the Eastman Museum gardens as well as lace, feathers, and even historic stained glass window fragments to sun print using several photographic processes invented before 1842.

Wet and Dry Collodion Negatives
September 10–14
This five-day hands-on negative workshop is for the experienced collodion ambrotypist or tintypist who wants to get to the next level.

Camera Obscura, Camera Lucida, and Silhouette
September 24–28
This five-day course is the only public workshop in the world that teaches how to use a box camera obscura, a tent camera obscura, a camera lucida, a pantograph, and a physionotrace to produce landscape pencil drawings and cut silhouettes.

Introduction to Analog Photography—NEW!
October 16–19
This is an introductory workshop specifically for 20th- and 21st-century black-and-white chemical photographic technique.

Carbon Tissue Making and Printing
November 6–9
Learn to make your own carbon tissues using pigments available at your local art supply store or online.

Tintype Boot Camp—NEW!
December 1
No photographic experience is required to attend, and you’ll leave with a 5×7″ tintype portrait made by an experienced tintypist and an information packet on how that plate was made.