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Land Acknowledgment

The George Eastman Museum resides within the ancestral, traditional, and contemporary lands of the Onöndowa’ga:’, or “the people of the Great Hill,” known in English as the Seneca people. Specifically, the museum occupies land ceded in the 1788 Phelps-Gorham Purchase, which was procured under false pretenses, duress, and coercion.

We pledge to honor and better serve the Indigenous individuals and communities who live here now, and those who were forcibly removed from their homelands. In offering this land acknowledgment, we affirm Indigenous sovereignty, history, cultures, and experiences.

At the George Eastman Museum, we are committed to sharing and amplifying Indigenous voices and work to do so locally and internationally in our exhibitions, collections, programs, and interpretation.


We are grateful to Michael Galaban and Grandell Logan from the Seneca Art & Culture Center at Ganondagan for their assistance in developing the museum's land acknowledgement.