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Submitted by Kate Meyers Emery,

Image from Sight Reading exhibit

This Saturday, we will be celebrating the legacy of independent theaters as part of Art House Theater Day. According to their website, "In an age where media has become more digital than tangible, more solitary than social, art house theaters remain the physical spaces where film lovers congregate and connect with intrepid, creative filmmaking. They are the beating heart for new and exciting cinema that is shaping the future of the medium."

Submitted by Bruce Barnes,

Image from Sight Reading exhibit

The George Eastman Museum relies on volunteers in many aspects of our activities. We are deeply grateful to these individuals for their selfless contributions to our mission.

Submitted by Kate Meyers Emery,

Image from Sight Reading exhibit

Congratulations to all of the winners from our Sight Reading Instagram Challenges, and thank you to everyone who participated. We really enjoyed see the diverse range of photographs and how well you were able to capture photographs based on the five concepts. 

Submitted by Guest Post,

Nathan Lyons

Lisa Hostetler, Curator in Charge of the Department of Photography remembers Nathan Lyons, as a photographer, presence in the Rochester arts community, and source of inspiration. 

Submitted by Jesse Peers,

Image from Sight Reading exhibit

From George Eastman's letters, photos and newspaper clippings, we are able to trace what happened to him during his life. Using this documentation, Jesse Peers, Legacy Collection Archivist at the George Eastman Museum, shares with us a particularly memorable trip that did not happen the way it was planned back in September 1916. 

Submitted by Kate Meyers Emery,

Image from Sight Reading exhibit

This is it! Our final challenge! For this Sight Reading Instagram Challenge, we want you to play with the viewers perceptions, and take photographs that create an optical illusion. A classic example is the photo taken by tourists in Italy of people around the Tower of Pisa that appear to be holding the building up. Think creatively about the scale of objects, or strategically positioning people or objects in the natural environment.

Submitted by Kate Meyers Emery,

Image of Jason's Exhibit in Belgium

On October 22, 2016, we will be opening our newest exhibition, A Matter of Memory: Photography as Object in the Digital Age. The exhibition explores the relationship between changes in the production of photographs due to technological advances, and how this impacts society’s relationship to memory. As part of this exhibition, Jason Lazarus will be displaying his project, Too Hard To Keep, which pulls from a growing archive of photographs that have been sent to Jason from around the world, and have been deemed too painful to hold on to by the original owner. Given that, we thought it would be fascinating to learn a little more about the project from Jason in his own words.

Submitted by Guest Post,

Image of Summer Interns

Hi, there! My name is Alison Thompson, and I am writing to share my personal experience as a Department of Photography Intern at the George Eastman Museum. For the past nine weeks, I have not only expanded my knowledge on history of photography, film, and museum practice, but I worked with an extremely diverse, intelligent, and thoughtful staff! Under their supervision, I was able to complete a variety of museum-related projects, giving me a great deal of academic and work experience.

Submitted by George Eastman Museum,

Image from Dental Dispensary exhibit

George Eastman is known for his work in revolutionizing photography, but did you know that he also had an interest in preventative dentistry? When he was younger, Eastman watched his mother have eight teeth pulled without anesthesia in their own kitchen. He himself lost teeth early in his life.

Submitted by Kate Meyers Emery,

Image from Sight Reading exhibit

Challenge: For this Sight Reading Instagram Challenge, we want you to think creatively about cropping and framing images. What you decide to show in a photograph (and what is hidden from view) can alter the viewers understanding of the photo. This week, play around with cropping your image in a creative way. 

Submitted by Guest Post,

Eliza Kozlowski and Taylor Lincoln in the conservatory

Hi there, my name is Taylor, intern at the George Eastman Museum, born and raised right outside the city of Rochester. This year I will enter my final year at St. Lawrence University, receiving my Bachelors in Communication. That’s right, I am the Communications summer intern at the George Eastman Museum.

Submitted by Guest Post,

Minecraft mansion

This week, we have a very special guest post. A few weeks ago, Mary Cavagnero tweeted an amazing picture to the Eastman Museum account of the Mr. Eastman's mansion recreated in Minecraft by her grandson, Jack. Once we had seen this first image, we wanted to know more! Jack was kind enough not only to share the images of the mansion and gardens, but also to write up a blog post about this process and his trip to the museum.

Submitted by Kate Meyers Emery,

Image from Sight Reading exhibit

Challenge: For this Sight Reading Instagram Challenge, we want you to capture movement. Whether you're taking a photo of an object that is actually moving, or something that conveys movement, this challenge is all about finding a way to convince the viewer that the object is in motion. Be creative, play with this concept, and see what you can come up with! No video is allowed for this challenge-you must capture movement in a still photograph.

Submitted by Jesse Peers,

Rheims building reduced to rubble

George Eastman left behind a paper trail- one that is so detailed in letters and photos that we are able to trace his daily life during certain periods of time. His letters and photographs trace his relationships with different family members, the growth of Kodak, and his travels around the world. It is because of this documentation, and the hard work of our Archival staff, that we can present this story of what Mr. Eastman was doing, exactly 100 years ago… Jesse Peers, Legacy Collection Archivist at the George Eastman Museum, shares George's trip from July 1916.

Submitted by Kate Meyers Emery,

Image from Sight Reading exhibit

Challenge: For our second Sight Reading Instagram Challenge, we want you to get up close and personal with your subject. The beauty of the closeup, is that despite not showing the whole object, we can still understand what it means. Sometimes, we gain more meaning by seeing objects with such close attention to detail. This week, we challenge you to take photos that show closeups of objects, people, or other subjects that may retain or change in meaning. Be creative! 

Submitted by Bruce Barnes,

Camera Obscura

Compared to the first floor of George Eastman’s historic mansion—which we restored more than 25 years ago to closely resemble how it looked during his life—we know less about the second floor and how it was decorated, and we have relatively few pieces of furniture that are original to the second-floor rooms. Nevertheless, over the course of the last few years, the George Eastman Museum has made great strides in revitalizing the second floor— and more enhancements are being planned. Walking through the mansion’s second floor has become an important part of the full Eastman Museum experience.

Submitted by Guest Post,

Letter to Olivia de Havilland

Happy Birthday Olivia de Havilland! Daniel LaTourette writes a letter to Ms. de Havilland on her 100th Birthday.

Submitted by Guest Post,

Dry plate photography at Letchworth State Park

Waterfalls, gelatin dry plates, large format cameras and Hiking. They all go together like peas and carrots. Which is exactly what we were thinking when we put together our first  “Dry Plates in the Woods” workshop at Letchworth State Park three years ago.

Submitted by Ken Fox,

Douglass Crockwell, James Reese, Leo Hurwitz, and Lothar Wolff.

The creation of a finding aid for any archival collection is always good news for both archivists and researchers. The creation of four finding aids calls for a celebration -- and a little explanation of why we're so excited about the finding aids for Douglass Crockwell, James Reese, Leo Hurwitz, and Lothar Wolff.

Submitted by Kate Meyers Emery,

Image from Sight Reading exhibit

Challenge: For our first Sight Reading Instagram Challenge, we want you to capture text within the landscape. Signs, symbols, and visual words are everywhere. From the major advertisements plastered on billboards and streets in cities, to more casual hand made signs on rural back roads. Text is everywhere. These signs beg for our attention, change our perception of the landscape, and shape the way we interact with our environment. This week, we challenge you to capture urban text- whether it be formal advertisements on the street, informal signs posted on walls, or other text-- be creative! 

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