fbpx The Narrow Trail | George Eastman Museum

Planning a visit? Masks encouraged for museum visitors.

Advance tickets recommended for nonmembers; click here to purchase tickets for future dates. 

The Narrow Trail

Tuesday, October 18, 2022, 7:30 p.m., Dryden Theatre

(William S. Hart, Lambert Hillyer, US 1917, 68 min., DCP)

One of the great silent movie cowboys, William S. Hart was—much like his peer “Broncho” Billy Anderson—a writer, director, and producer as well. Hart fulfills all of those roles in The Narrow Trail, where he stars as Ice Harding, an escaped outlaw, ambivalent about his future life in crime. While holding up a stagecoach, Ice meets “Admiral” Bates (Milton Ross) and his beautiful daughter, Betty (Sylvia Breamer). Ice refuses to take Betty’s jewelry because of his attraction to her. They meet again in Saddle City, where Ice is posing as a rich rancher, but the Admiral has put his own plan into place.

Live piano accompaniment by Dr. Philip C. Carli.

 

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