fbpx Wilkie Collins Double Feature | The Woman in White | The Moonstone | George Eastman Museum

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As of Tuesday, September 28, for all programs and screenings in the Dryden Theatre, patrons must show proof of vaccination and wear masks. Learn about our updated health & safety procedures

Wilkie Collins Double Feature | The Woman in White | The Moonstone

Tuesday, October 19, 2021, 7:30 p.m., Dryden Theatre

For this screening, patrons must show proof of vaccination and wear masks. For more information, please see our Health & Safety page.

The Woman in White

(director unknown, US 1912, 32 min., 35mm)

The Moonstone

(Frank Hall Crane, US 1915, 77 min., 35mm)

Nineteenth-century “chiller” author and Charles Dickens contemporary Wilkie Collins made a career out of combining social commentary and women in danger in his serialized novels. This made him a perfect source for some of the earliest adaptations in cinema history. In these two preservations from the George Eastman Museum, filmmakers tackle his most famous works. The Woman in White is an escapee from a sanitarium who holds dark secrets and ominous warnings for a young lady betrothed to a baronet. In The Moonstone, a cursed diamond stolen from a temple in India passes from hand to hand, leaving death in its wake.

Live piano accompaniment by Dr. Philip C. Carli.

 

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